Seite:Marsh Hallig 1856.djvu/93

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Detdiar sidj as efterluket wurden.


93

THE POLICY OF NATIONS.

Mander, casting at the same time a glance at the small
collection of books.
  "You think so," said the lady, smiling, "because you
see the titles of Arabic and Persian books. No ; these
belong to a period of Hold's life when, ho says, the
grandmother's farthingale was as pleasing in his eyes tis
the fragrant garlands on the heads of the grandchil-
dren, or when the dried plants or fruits of distant coun-
tries tasted better than the fresh plum of the homestead
garden. If it were not for mc, the dust would settle
on the gilt lettering of many of them ; only a few
can boast of retaining the freshness of his early
affection."
  "Naturally," said Mander, "the present rapid ad-
vancement of scientific knowledge obliges the educated
man to leave his favorite pursuit somewhat in the back-
ground ; and little as I am acquainted with theological
studies, I know that the divine who desires to keep up
in some degree with the progress of ecclesiastical leani-
ing, will have reading enough."
  "If," replied the wife, in a tone which betrayed the
fear of saying more than was proper for the ears of
strangers — " if the minister had any means of supplying
his intellectual wants. Hold often laments this, and
said the other day that a quarter's salary of an ordinary
opera-singer, or ballet-dancer, would be sufficient to
supply all the clergymen of the hallig, who are cut off
from book markets and all social intercourse, with such
journals and other publications of the day as would
enable them to keep pace with the literature of their
profession. Then there was the daily school teaching,
which from the low standard of education on the hallig,